Home Construction - 15 Reasons Why Becoming Your Own General Contractor Is a Bad Idea

Home Construction – 15 Reasons Why Becoming Your Own General Contractor Is a Bad Idea

Unless you are a professional builder / general contractor or you have close friends or relatives who are and will be willing to work with you at any time, acting as your own building contractor, more often than not, can have disastrous results.

Many times we have seen homeowners who have chosen to do their own home construction contracts with the aim of saving money just to spend far more on the construction budget than they would have spent if they had hired a builder to handle the entire project in the first place. .

The idea of ​​saving by becoming your own general contractor is a myth

General contracts are serious work that requires the services of a licensed professional. The following are reasons that are often overlooked but are very important to contribute to the results of expensive and unprofitable home construction when the homeowner performs his own professional contractor general duties:

Lack of knowledge of the latest building code rules and regulations can result in code violations, failure of building inspections and the need for expensive reconstruction delays.

Less experience with the construction process and construction procedures will affect the scheduling of subcontractors. Work done out of sequence can produce poor quality and often requires expensive repairs and reconstruction.

The inability to schedule subcontractors in a way that optimizes working conditions can be very disruptive. Too many different subs work at once can cause confusion and make monitoring more difficult. Workers stumble with each other and obstruct each other can result in costly mistakes and a lot of damage that is not found until it’s too late.

The unfamiliarity with preparation of work among those needed to optimize each sub-contract project can cause construction delays. Each sub-contract work must be completed correctly and ready for the next …

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Floor Joists: Eco-Friendly Solutions

Floor Joists: Eco-Friendly Solutions

Home construction practices and procedures had changed drastically over the years. Floor joists once constructed with 2×10’s has been replaced with engineered I-beams and LVLs (Laminated Veneer Lumber) capable of spanning distances without supporting structural members which were often required to carry the load of additional floors. Affordable and lightweight, engineered I-beam floor joists have subsequently replaced the antiquated double or triple 2×12 floor joists, with proven engineered designs that are far superior to old traditional methods. Engineered I-beams provide superior strength, uniformity and level perfection of all completed subfloors, essential for the installation of all interior flooring finishing material, especially hardwood flooring.

Constructed with the visible appearance of an “I”

I-beams consist of a top and bottom rib normally 2×4’s dimensional lumber. Sandwiched between the top and bottom ribs, specially designed OSB, (Oriented Strand Board) completes the simple but extremely load carrying capacity of the I-beam with precision and accuracy. Integrated into the design of the I-beam are pre-designed and placed “knockouts” which allow for the installation of plumbing and electrical artifacts through the I-beams at pre-determined locations, saving time in pre-drilling standard 2×12 floor joists, with a reduction in labor costs.

Capable of spanning lengths of up to 24′ or more without supporting basement floor jacks, engineered I-beam floor joists allow full basement completion without loss of floor space and the “boxing in” of supporting columns when using old 2×12 joist framing methods. Available in widths from 10″ to 16″, and a variety of top and bottom rib specifications, engineered I-beam joists offer versatility in home construction which continues to receive national recognition.

The way of installing a new hardwood floor

When installing a new hardwood floor, nothing is more important than the precision and accuracy of all substrate material, including the joists. Old 2×12 floor joists often …

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